O.P.P

Friend: “Bro, is that your training log?”

Me: “Yeah”

Friend: “Can I see your workouts, I need some training ideas.”

Translation: Somebody wants free stuff.

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Had I let my friend look through my training log without offering any explanations one of several things could have happened:  (1) He would have copied things down perfectly, and not gained the results he was seeking.  (2) He would have modified what he saw, and may or may not have gotten the results he was seeking. (3) He would have injured himself by picking a program well beyond his ability or (4) He would have come away thinking he was reading the entries of a madman.  

Fact: What I do at any given time could be someones warm up or a trip to the hospital for another.

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I suppose I should be slightly flattered that a person would be interested in the programming I’m running on myself. This request however turned into a rather lengthy conversation on O.P,P. (other peoples programs). (Just like most of the times when I’m asked to tweak someones technique.)

Basically, I showed that my programming changes to reflect the goal(s) at the time, and that each features things unique to my needs.  For example, I had a weak spot off my chest in the Bench Press.  My programming during that period was designed to improve my strength in that range, and the %’s were based on a competition maximum ( the heaviest I’ve lifted in a contest.) Furthermore, all the accessory exercises were designed to bring up muscle groups that were comparatively lagging and help drive the bench press off the chest.

This was a program designed for a singular person (me), with my relative strengths and weaknesses, my injury history, physical leverages, personality and tolerances.

My friend has no competition history, completely different leverages and technical skill and a totally different injury history.  His weak spot is currently opposite mine, and would benefit from a different approach.

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Out of personal curiosity I randomly picked four pages out of my log just to see what could have happened.  I can favorably wager my friend would have injured himself if he attempted to copy some of my work.  The “Hyde sections” intensity levels are beyond his ability to recover, and while the “Jekyll sections” generally feature things he can do, they are not ideal for his needs and still feature things he cannot physically perform or recover from.

What about the workouts you find in the popular fitness magazines and online?

I’ll start by saying that they’re not all bad. I’ll further state that even in generic programming some authors know what they’re doing far more than others. Your odds of randomly landing on a program that is perfect for you and your goals based on your current physical standing is astronomically low

Believe me when I say I’ve seen some really bad stuff online and in print, and this is coming from a guy that has sat through the Fantastic Four Re-boot (at least I didn’t pay for it.)

The person (insert famous bodybuilder/fitness model/celebrity) demonstrating the workout may never have done it at all. Even if they did do it, and even if it happened to work for them doesn’t mean it will work for you.

Consider the audience and goal for which the program was written. In some magazine cases, the programs were written for bodybuilders by other bodybuilders, or powerlifters for other powerlifters.  Not for the sedentary 46 year old office worker that wants to lose his love handles and reduce his man-boobs.

You’ll also find generic collections of exercises put together without thought or nuance which follows a number of bootcamp and GroupEx models.  The workouts may be perfect for 1-2 out of every 10 people, and sub-optimal or possibly dangerous for the rest.

FACT: If the article features small dumbbell curls while standing on a BOSU ball then you’ve picked up the wrong magazine or are on the wrong website. The model may look great, but I doubt they got their physique from that exercise, or that it even contributed to a degree, they did however get better at juggling.  

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